Fast Forward Friday with Claire R. McDougall

For this week’s Fast Forward Friday, we interviewed writer Claire R. McDougall. She is a native of Scotland, graduated from Oxford University and lives now in Aspen, Colorado where she raised her family. After an early start as a newspaper columnist, her career in creative writing moved through the genres of poetry and short stories to settle on Scottish novels with an historical bent.

Q: What are you currently working on?  Tell us about it.

I have just finished book three in a trilogy, the first of which, Veil Of Time, was published by Simon & Schuster in 2014.

Q: What was the inspiration and impetus for doing this project?

When I wrote the first in this series, I had no idea I would take the story any further.  My impetus for that book was just to set a story in this magical place in Scotland where I grew up and where the kings of Scotland were once crowned in the very early Middle Ages. I didn’t want to write strict historical fiction, so I decided to write a time travel story.  In the first book, without really planning it, I was already beginning to raise a question about what the pagan world lost when Christianity took over.  But I hadn’t said enough: in the second and third books, I go deep into the question, and, in fact, imagine an alternate present with no Christian history.

Q: Who are your artistic heroes – who have had an impact on you and your work?

On the wall of my office hang three portraits: Emily Bronte, DH Lawrence and Friedrich Nietzsche. All of them have had a profound effect on me.  I am also an ardent fan of John Steinbeck.  The Scottish author Lewis Grassic Gibbon sowed the seed in me that it was possible to present the real lives of Scotland’s people to the world in a literary way.

Q: What keeps you motivated and inspired as an artist?

I have been writing stories for eons now and only in the last decade have I had a literary agent to my name. Writing, as all the arts, is a tough business with mazes and gatekeepers along the way. Progress often happens at a snail’s pace. So, no clever lines or dreams of fame and fortune will really sustain you through the long haul. I suppose I have had since childhood a sense that I would make it in the end. That’s not something I wake up in the morning and tell myself, but it probably explains why I have kept on going despite the odds. And then, of course, too, like Martin Luther, the bottom line is: Here I stand. I can do no other.

Q: What other projects would you like to tell us about?

Since I have been writing for so long, I have a big backlog of books that haven’t seen the light of day yet. My agent wasn’t able to sell my first novel,  the one he picked me up for.  It’s the dearest one to my heart and tracks a young girl’s journey from her rural Scottish home to Oxford University, so a bit more biographical than most of my books. Among others, I have a “family” novel about a wild mustang. So, the stories are all over the map theme-wise, but most are centered in Scotland. Trying to get a foot up on the entertainment industry, I have also written all the screenplays for the stories.

Q: What is one instance of knowing you are living in your vision?

I suppose I feel like I’m on the right track when I  see all around me support for the idea that we need to take a serious look at where we came from. Even my biographical novel is questioning societal norms, the veneration of the life of the head over the heart, in that case.  And then as I witness the decline of  Christianity even in my lifetime, I feel people are looking for something to fulfill their spiritual yearnings. It was always in my nature to poke sticks into things and see if they could withstand the probe.

Q: If there were no barriers to entry, what is one thing you would be doing?

All my books would be on book shop shelves. All the movies of my stories would have been made.

Q: What has been big your biggest obstacle in achieving your vision?

With my background in academia, it took years to find my literary voice and time, too, to understand what makes for readable prose.  The industry is geared to fashionable trends and edgy writers, who often don’t have a lasting voice or anything real to say.  I had to try for years to get an agent, so the whole process has been an exercise in patience, not a quality that I have in huge amounts.

Q: What do you do to stay connected to your creative self?

I keep a quote by DH Lawrence in my office that says: In the end, the soul is alone, brooding on the face of the uncreated flux, as a bird on a dark sea.  It’s a rather grandiose thought, but the truth is that as creative people, in the end we are alone with ourselves You can go to as many writers’ conferences and writers’ groups as you can fit in, and you can bask for a while in the celebrity of having a book published, but the reality for any creative person is the creative moment, which is a solitary place.

Q: If you could let go of something that has held you back, what would it be?

I think it would be the tendency to think that everything is going to be solved once all my books are out there and all my films have been made. It would certainly solve some financial problems but not any issues I have with myself.

Q: What is your favorite piece of art?

I have two watercolours by Jennifer MacLean on my living room wall.  They are of crofts and tumble-down walls within a Scottish landscape, and they make me whistful and full of longing for Scotland.  So, they’re doing their job as art.

Q: What person do you most admire, living or dead?

I’m not sure “admire” is the word, but there are definitely people, dead people as it turns out, that I have pulled in alongside.  I suppose they are people like Nietzsche and Lawrence who had something important to say about our lives but had to overcome huge resistance to get that vision out.  In the end they were true to their sense of things and that was their strength.

Q: If you could be known and celebrated for one thing, what would it be?

I would like to be known as a good writer who had something important to say about western civilisation.

Q: If you could describe yourself in one word what would it be?

Passionate. (I’m a Scorpio – it’s kind of written in!)

Q: What is your guilty pleasure?

I would say chocolate, but it’s not that guilty. I have given myself permission to read silly glossy magazines when I go to the hairdresser.  I feel guilty, but every few weeks, it’s okay to do it.

Q: If you could sit down with yourself 15 years ago, what would you say?

Be patient! This is going to take a while.

Q: Where would you most like to live?

In a house by the sea in Argyll, Scotland.

Q: What is your idea of success?

Well, I am enough of a child of my age to think that having sufficient financial resources would count. But the real measure, I think, would be that I have said what I have to say and started up some kind of  cultural discourse that leads to real change.  

Q: What is your idea of happiness?

Happiness is fleeting, of course, but I’ll tell  you one fantasy of happiness I entertain, which is to have enough money to pay for my children and significant others to come and spend a week or so in a house right on the ocean. Wouldn’t that be nice?

Q: Final Thoughts?

The creative life is tough because you are in this constant tug-of-war between your creative vision and the needs of the market. It’s not for the faint of heart and not to be undertaken lightly. But then the creative life is truly not one you choose, but something that is born out of who you are.  

 

Fast Forward Friday with Lisa D’Apolito

For this week’s Fast Forward Friday, we interviewed director-producer and documentarian Lisa D’Apolito. She started her career as an actor with parts in films including Goodfellas. When she started working at an ad agency as a producer she realized she loved being behind the camera instead of being in front of it. As producer-director of  3Faces Films, in addition to her passion projects, Lisa works with corporate clients but also believes in giving back to non-profits. She continues to direct and produce for Gilda’s Club, Planned Parenthood, GVYC and Surfer Environmental Alliance. Her current passion project is LOVE Gilda a new documentary about comedienne Gilda Radner.

Q: What are you currently working on?  Tell us about it.

My documentary film LOVE Gilda – The Eternal Spirit of Gilda Radner. In her own words, comedienne Gilda Radner looks back and reflects on her life and career. It weaves together recently discovered audiotapes; interviews with her friends – Lorne Michaels, Martin Short, Laraine Newman; rare home movies shot by Gene Wilder and friends; and diaries read by modern day comediennes inspired by Gilda – Bill Hader, Melissa McCarthy, Amy Poehler, Maya Rudolph and Cecily Strong. LOVE Gilda offers a unique window into the honest and whimsical world of a beloved performer whose greatest role was sharing her story.

Q: What was the inspiration and impetus for doing this project?

The idea for LOVE Gilda came out of Joanne’s creative group.  I had been doing pro bono videos for Gilda’s Club, a support place for people and their families living with cancer, and realized the deep connection people had with Gilda Radner.  She has a very unique legacy as she lives on in the world of comedy but also in the world of cancer.  

Q: Who are your artistic heroes – who have had an impact on you and your work?

When I was an actress, I was lucky to have the opportunity to be directed by Martin Scorsese.  He was so nice, so calm, funny and yet really knew what he wanted from a scene.  He made it seem so easy and comfortable. I have seen so many people stress over production but being on the set is really the best part of a film for me.

Q: What keeps you motivated and inspired as an artist?

I grew up in Greenwich Village in very creative times. As I kid I was always around creative people.

Q: What other projects would you like to tell us about?

 I also have a funny screenplay that Gilda Radner wrote.  I hope to start working on producing it next.

Q: What is one instance of knowing you are living in your vision?

I think when I was interviewing Amy Poehler.  We were having a conversation about Gilda and her writings.  I had so much fun with her and Maya, Bill, Cecily and Melissa.  And it is all on film!

Q: If there were no barriers to entry, what is one thing you would be doing?

Living in a beautiful space overlooking the ocean.

Q: What has been big your biggest obstacle in achieving your vision?

Though I have 20 years in directing and production, this is my first feature documentary.  I have come across many people who say, “you are a first time  filmmaker and no, this is how it is done.”   I was listening but now I realize that there is no “this is how it is done.”   A creative process and choices are unique, and do not always fit into someone else’s box.

Q: What do you do to stay connected to your creative self?

I have great creative friends to talk with, I go a lot of museums and I walk in the park.

Q: If you could let go of something that has held you back, what would it be?

Listening to others who may have their own interests.

Q: What is your favorite piece of art?  

There are so many.  I love Joan of Arc by Jules Bastien-Lepage at the Met.

Q: What person do you most admire, living or dead?

Gilda Radner!

Q: If you could be known and celebrated for one thing, what would it be?

 I followed my dreams.

Q: If you could describe yourself in one word what would it be?

Sensitive.

Q: What is your guilty pleasure?

Wanting it to rain on days I have nowhere to go.

Q: If you could sit down with yourself 15 years ago, what would you say?

You did it! You achieved your dreams.

Q: Where would you most like to live?

By the ocean.

Q: What is your idea of success?

Not worrying about finances and having security to do some fun things.

Q: What is your idea of happiness?

Being by or in the ocean.

Q: Final Thoughts?

Thanks Joanne for your great sessions and advice as I start making some major decisions about my final partners in completing LOVE Gilda.

 

 

Fast Forward Friday with Jennifer Snowdon

snowdenFor this week’s Fast Forward Friday, we interviewed makeup artist Jennifer Snowdon. Her work includes film,features and shorts, television, commercials, theater, reality shows, documentaries, corporate videos, private consulting and workshops. She has award winning directors and celebrities as her clients. For more information, visit www.jennifersnowdon.com.

Q: What are you currently working on?  Tell us about it.

I have been busy rebranding myself to set up more opportunity teaching makeup for actors, individuals and groups; as well as preparing for the second shoot for WonderamaTV this summer.

Q: What was the inspiration and impetus for doing this project?

I love sharing my expertise and finding others’ experiences opened by it, whether for a role or for their life. Wonderama is a great concept variety show that inspires young people to find their gifts.  It is true to my purpose of bringing meaning in what I do.

Q: Who are your artistic heroes – who have had an impact on you and your work?

My grandmother Doris Snowdon – painter and my first mentor who taught me color theory in her row boat and how to sew for my dolls at 8 years old. My Barbies never dated, they designed!!

Georgia O’Keefe – “Make it so big that everyone will have to notice it!”

Dr. Kenneth G. Mills – when I was ready a teacher … the Universal message
.

Q: What keeps you motivated and inspired as an artist? 

Working with kindred spirits on their passion projects in a supportive role. This inspires me to never give up on my own! Perfect example was the film No Pay, No Nudity with Nathan Lane, Gabriel Byrne, Frances Conroy, Boyd Gaines, Donna Murphy and more …

 It just topped me up with inspiration working with Lee Wilkof on his directorial debut. Check it out on Amazon, itunes and Starz.

 Q: What other projects would you like to tell us about?

I’ve started writing my first book/screenplay based on a true story you’ll never believe. I have a children’s story to publish that is already illustrated, Imagine That.  And an animation to collaborate on, Wake up the Questions,a poem in my own voice! A Dr. Suess-esque poem with a Mother Earth voice.

Q: What is one instance of knowing you are living in your vision?

When I have recited Wake up the Questions and the listener is stunned at where it took them. It’s for the young of all ages.

Q: If there were no barriers to entry, what is one thing you would be doing?

 Working on all of the above and getting them out to the world.

Q: What has been big your biggest obstacle in achieving your vision?

 Figuring out how to sustain myself with enough time and quiet energy left to just do the work.

Q: What do you do to stay connected to your creative self?

Attend live performances, work on others films and projects, watch other’s works, cheer us all on.

Q: If you could let go of something that has held you back, what would it be?

 Thinking that I have to do it all myself first to prove I’m worthy of receiving support.

Q: What is your favorite piece of art?

 I love Eskimo line drawings. I was once given an art assignment by Dr. Mills to capture a walrus and a dolphin with five lines each.  It changed my entire life. Essence 101.

Q: What person do you most admire, living or dead?

Dr. Kenneth G. Mills – always dared to make the impossible possible.

Q: If you could be known and celebrated for one thing, what would it be? 

Since I was a child I was driven by a calling to do something important. That comes in many guises and it guided my choices in life that were not always understood by parents and others. I really feel my writing would fulfill that call from my own essence.

Q: If you could describe yourself in one word what would it be?

Persistent.

Q: What is your guilty pleasure?

I love HGTV shows! Especially Fixer Upper. I wanted to be an architect/interior designer when young and I love makeovers for people for the same reason. I just love people and problem solving with art.

Q: If you could sit down with yourself 15 years ago, what would you say?

Do it now! Ask for help somehow!

Q: Where would you most like to live?

 Somewhere in the woods communing with Nature but accessible to city life and travel.

Q: What is your idea of success?

To be a part of something that is meaningful to others. Any form of the “make a difference” life that opens a new experience or broader horizon for someone.

Q; What is your idea of happiness?

Daring myself to go beyond what I think I’m capable of and accomplishing it. The only legit way to self-esteem that I know of.

Q: Final Thoughts?

 Makeituptrue! Dare to be your unique self, express your unique gifts. They are needed more than you know and are part of the Essential puzzle of Being .

 

Fast Forward Friday with Danijela Stajnfeld

Danijela HeadshotFor this week’s Fast Forward Friday, we interviewed actor-director-producer Danijela Stajnfeld. After earning her MFA from the Academy of Film and Theater at the University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia, Danijela achieved critical and commercial acclaim in film, television and theater in her country. The Hole, her directorial debut, premiered at The New Filmmakers Film Festival NY 2016 and has been presented at Women Behind the Camera screening series in Los Angeles. Hold Me Right is an especially important project for Danijela, as she draws on her personal experiences and activism to create this documentary film, with the hope of inspiring social change. For more information, visit http://www.holdmerightfilm.com/

Q: What are you currently working on? Tell us about it.

I am currently working on a documentary, Hold Me Right, which explores the aftermath of sexual assault through interviews with all of those who are affected by these crimes. This includes survivors, perpetrators and the wrongfully accused. The production is currently in the final stages of principal photography and we are preparing to work on a promotional crowd-funding campaign in order to begin post-production.

We have also recently partnered up with Glam4Good, an amazing organization that uses style and fashion to promote positivity and inspire positive self-esteem. I’m very excited about future collaborations between Glam4Good and Hold Me Right.

Q: What was the inspiration and impetus for doing this project?

After experiencing the effects of sexual assault firsthand, I was able to understand the complicated aftermath of the initial crime. I understand both the trauma of the initial crime and the second trauma faced when forced to be judged and silenced by a culture that does not provide support to its survivors. This second traumatization is an often ignored narrative and one that I believe can and will be heard through the final product of this film.

Q: Who are your artistic heroes – who have had an impact on you and your work?

Lauren Greenfield, the director of Princess of Versaille, certainly inspires me and my work on this documentary. Kitty Green, the director of Ukraine Is Not A Brothel, has also influenced my work, significantly.

Q: What keeps you motivated and inspired as an artist?

The motivation behind my artistic endeavors is my constant desire to create and tell stories, through multiple outlets. I am both an actress and a filmmaker because I need to be, it is my passion.

Q: What other projects would you like to tell us about?

I’m currently developing a mockumentary called Stasya, which is a comedic take on an Eastern European woman who has just moved to America and dreams of becoming the most desirable trophy wife.

I’m also developing Public Service Asses, an Instagram movement with sexist images accompanied by anti-sexist statements.

Q: What is one instance of knowing you are living in your vision?

It was a personal experience that inspired me to make this film. So, of course, I came into this with my own perspective. However, over time, I have been able to take a step back and develop an outlook that goes beyond my personal experience. I think that this is a sign that I am living in my vision, in this film, rather than in my own head.

Q: If there were no barriers to entry, what is one thing you would be doing?

To my understanding, there are no unbreakable barriers when one has a true calling and I believe this is mine.

Q: What has been your biggest obstacle in achieving your vision?

I always feel that there are not enough hours in a day.

Q: What do you do to stay connected to your creative self?

 Creating comes naturally to me because it is what I love to do and, because of that, I am always connected to my creative self. In fact, I am often overwhelmed by the number of projects I want to take on.

Q: If you could let go of something that has held you back, what would it be?

I wish that I could let go of my tendency to be impatient. I want things to be completed immediately and, when they take too long, I sometimes get frustrated with the project – and myself.

Q: What is your favorite piece of art?

It’s very hard to answer that question. There are so many creations that I draw from and am inspired by. My answer changes with the moment. Right now, the work of Sally Mann comes to mind. I particularly love her piece At Twelve.

Q: What person do you most admire, living or dead?

Oscar Wilde.

Q: If you could be known and celebrated for one thing, what would it be?

I had a chance to be celebrated and recognized as an actress, back home in Serbia. I didn’t find anything appealing about it. Thinking about how my work is received is not something that I consider.

Q: If you could describe yourself in one word what would it be?

Mirror.

Q: What is your guilty pleasure?

Coffee and cigarettes.

Q: If you could sit down with yourself 15 years ago, what would you say?

Dear Danijela,

Your parents fears are not yours to be fearful of.

Q: Where would you most like to live?

New York City. It was my home before it was my home.

Q: What is your idea of success?

The moment that you succeed is the moment you are done. Success, to me, exists to reveal and inspire new challenges.

Q: What is your idea of happiness?

“If you pursue happiness, you are an ordinary person. If happiness pursues you, you are an extraordinary person. Do not chase happiness; let it chase you.” Petar Dunov.

Q: Final Thoughts?

Don’t take things too seriously.

 

Fast Forward Friday with Phil Augusta Jackson

Phil_Augusta_JacksonFor this week’s Fast Forward Friday, we interviewed the multi-talented actor-writer-musician-comedian Phil Augusta Jackson. His writing credits include Comedy Central’s Key & Peele, Survivor’s Remorse on the Starz Network, and Fox’s Brooklyn Nine-Nine. He’s received Emmy, WGA, and NAACP award nominations for his contributions on Key & Peele.  Phil was selected as a performer at the 2015 New Faces Characters Showcase at the Montreal Just for Laughs Festival. For more information about Phil, visit http://philaugustajackson.com/about/.

Q: What are you currently working on?  Tell us about it.

I am currently writing for Brooklyn Nine-Nine, a television series on the Fox network. I’m a co-producer on the show. It’s a cop workplace comedy starring a diverse and fantastic cast that includes Andy Samberg, Andre Braugher, Terry Crews, Melissa Fumero, Joe Lo Truglio, Chelsea Peretti, Stephanie Beatriz, Joel McKinnon Miller and Dirk Blocker. My job includes ideating new episodes, writing and re-writing scripts, and consulting on set as the episodes are filmed. 

As far as personal projects go, I just finished a short film called Long Lost, which I co-wrote and co-starred in with my friend and collaborator Aaron Covington. I also make music  – hip-hop with elements of R&B and spoken word – , and I just finished work on a new EP called New Palm Tree that I will be releasing in April. I’ve collaborated with director, Nic Stanch, and DP, Carlos Medina, to create two music videos to visually complement this EP as well.  

Q: What was the inspiration and impetus for doing this project?

As far as Brooklyn Nine-Nine goes, I had always been a fan of the show. I moved out to Los Angeles from NYC at the end of 2013 to write for the sketch show Key & Peele and after wrapping that show wanted to get more narrative experience. I worked on a great show on the Starz network called Survivor’s Remorse which gave me my first professional taste of crafting narrative and after working on that show was fortunate enough to get an interview and land the job on Brooklyn Nine-Nine – I’ve written on season three and four of the show. 

As far as the personal projects go, I’m always looking to create work of my own to keep refining my voice. Also, at a basic level there is something very satisfying to me about finishing projects. Long Lost is an idea that came about while I was out at dinner with my friend Aaron. The movie Creed had just come out, and he co-wrote it. I was in the midst of working on Brooklyn Nine-Nine, and we both felt like it would be cool to work on something together. We came up with an idea that night about the idea of two brothers meeting for the first time on a park bench. We wrote it over the course of a few months, and self-funded the project with no real goal but to create something and see it through to completion. 

And when it comes to the music, it’s something that I’ve been doing since I was in high school. It’s like my therapy. There is something so unique, challenging and rewarding about writing and creating music. I create music in waves, usually after or in the midst of life-changes. This new ep is pretty much inspired by my transition into Los Angeles, where I’ve been living the past three years. It’s five songs and I’m really excited for people to take a listen to it. 

Q: Who are your artistic heroes – who have had an impact on you and your work?

Jordan Peele and Keegan Michael Key – they are both geniuses and I was a huge fan of them both before getting hired to write on season four and five of their show. They are masters at collaboration, brilliant writers and performers, and all around good dudes. They also both have aspirations outside of comedy, and it’s fascinating and inspiring to see them both transcend the comedy genre that popularized them with such fluidity and ease. 

Basquiat – I love his art, and the documentary Radiant Child is amazing.

Rene Magritte – I love his art. I released a music album called False Mirrors several years ago and the idea for that album hit me when I saw Magritte’s False Mirror painting at the MoMa. It really spoke to me in a way art never had before.  

My parents – we are a product of our upbringing and my parents always encouraged me to think for myself and get stuff done. 

Anne Hathaway – she’s a great actress and I want to be a great actor. 

Jill Scott – I love her music. It’s so Philadelphia, and that’s where I’m from. She’s got her own flare and style and is so talented; musically she’s a genius. 

Kanye West — too much to get into, but I think Kanye is great. 

Ava Duvernay – she’s a trailblazer, and I hope to direct someday. 

Denzel Washington – he’s an icon. 

Edward Albee – The Zoo Story is one of my favorites — I read it as I was starting to realize that I really wanted to be a writer.  

There’s more, but those are the names off the top of my head. I will almost certainly regret some names that I can’t think of right now. 

Q: What keeps you motivated and inspired as an artist?  

I’m a huge fan of dialogue. Crafting scripts where the conversations feel real is something that I love to do – whether it be comedy or something more dramatic, I’m really drawn to things that feel like I could actually see happening, or see myself or someone else saying and experiencing. So that being said, listening to other people and their stories also keeps me motivated and inspired. And that is true whether it be a sketch, a pilot, a feature, making music or performing improv. 

Q: What other projects would you like to tell us about?

I have an indie feature that I wrote called Seven Days. My appetite for writing features has been growing steadily and I’m excited about the potential in this project. I’m sure there will be a lot of rewriting moving forward but it feels good to have a draft. 

I also started an improv collective called The Colin Kaepernicks. I’ve been studying improv for years and found am amazing group of people who are down to experiment with improv and what it can be. We often have sets that have a lot of tears followed by a lot of laughter – it’s cool playing with a comedic art form and inserting some drama into it while still delivering laughs when it feels right.  

Q:  What is one instance of knowing you are living in your vision?

My first day writing for Key & Peele. Keegan came up to me and gave me a big hug. Jordan came over and gave me a high-five. And then 10 minutes later I pitched my first two ideas as a writer on the show. That moment still feels surreal and for me was a real moment of – “This is the very thing that I’ve been working towards. Now let’s not mess it up.” 

Q: If there were no barriers to entry, what is one thing you would be doing?

Getting my supremely talented friends work. 

Q: What has been big your biggest obstacle in achieving your vision?

When it comes to writing, reminding myself to judge the draft and not judge the process. I can overthink things sometimes but it’s better to overthink once you have something to revise, so I try to stay out of my head while I’m writing, but it’s a challenge. 

When it comes to acting, I think the brutal process of auditioning. I’ve been performing for years, but there’s something about that audition room that I have yet to master. I’m working to get better all-around as an actor.

Q: What do you do to stay connected to your creative self?

Taking trips to places I’ve never been before, and shaking up the “routine” in general keeps me connected to my creative self. I’m heading to Spain in a few weeks to vacation and to clear my head and experience culture like I never have. I’m pretty sure I will return with some creative ideas. 

I also take long walks – about five miles a day, sometimes more. I get a lot of ideas on these walks. It’s therapeutic and gives me time to think about an idea or just let my mind wander. 

Q: If you could let go of something that has held you back, what would it be? 

Self-doubt as an actor. Letting go of the unhealthy perspective that I wasn’t good enough for a role instead of the role just not being right. 

Also, not just telling myself what I want creatively but letting it be known to other people, including people that can actually assist in making it happen: i.e. sharing my vision. It feels crazy sometimes telling people what you think you’re capable of and I’m trying to get better about just letting it out without feeling odd about it. 

Q: What is your favorite piece of art?

New York City.

Q: What person do you most admire, living or dead?

Two people, Joseph and Oona Jackson, my parents. 

Q: If you could be known and celebrated for one thing, what would it be?

Being a dope artist. 

Q:  If you could describe yourself in one word what would it be?

Listener. 

Q: What is your guilty pleasure?

The pumpkin loaf at Starbucks.

Q: If you could sit down with yourself 15 years ago, what would you say?

Don’t regret not going to law school, it will be one of the best decisions you ever make. 

Q: Where would you most like to live?

Fall and Spring in NYC. Winter and Summer in LA. 

Q: What is your idea of success?

Waking up and being happy. 

Q: Final Thoughts?

Thank you for your time.